Arriving at
・ 1-Frame Delay and 0-Frame Delay



 The rule of Frame Delay has been simplified in Virtua Fighter 5 Final Showdown, so you had better confirm the system once again. You are referred to 'VF Moves Project (Ed., Akai)' for detailed analysis of attacks in this chapter.[1]



5・4 1-Frame Delay and 0-Frame Delay
 In section 5・1, we described an important concept: a button of the attack command have to enter within Input Buffer.[2] This section considers in more depth the point that emerged from the discussions of command input. Now we shall introduce a top tip for command input: you can start to enter the direction portion before Input Buffer. An example of this is Jean performing Gyaku Seikenzuki 66P. The figure below has Player 1 advantaged by 4 frames due to blocking Player 2's Hiji'uchi 6P (Figure 53).


 Figure 53



 Player 1 then attempts Gyaku Seikenzuki (15 frames attack) against Player 2's 11 frames punch. Both attacks are supposed to reach their Active Phase[3] at the same time, and Player 1 should win because Gyaku Seikenzuki do more damage than normal punch (See chapter 3).[4] You might be surprised seeing the result that was the other way (Figure 54).


 Figure 54click here if you want to look at actual command input.



 You have to look at actual command input of Player 1 carefully. Player 1 keeps the top tip for command input in mind, and starts to enter the direction portion (marked red 6 in Diagram 58) before the first frame of Input Buffer (highlighted yellow). However, there is a delay of 1 frame though Player 1 entered attack command P within Input Buffer. This is called 1-Frame Delay.


 Diagram 58



 How do you get around 1-Frame Delay? The answers are shown in Diagram 59. All you have to do is enter Dash Command 66 not later than the first frame of Input Buffer. By using this method, you can avoid 1-Frame Delay so Gyaku Seikenzuki starts executing in the fastest time possible (Figure 55).


 Diagram 59*
 *Notice that the the first frame of Input Buffer (highlighted yellow) is the special permission for input.


 Figure 55click here if you want to look at actual command input.



 The next example will emphasize one aspect of Frame Delay system, in which Akira is performing Yakuho Chouchu 666P. The figure below has Player 1 advantaged by 3 frames (See chapter 4, Figure 45: click here).[5] Subsequently, Player 1 attempts Yakuho Chouchu (15 frames attack) against Player 2's 12 frames punch (Figure 56). Although Player 1 started to enter Dash Command (marked red 66 in Diagram 510) before Input Buffer, a delay of 1 frame has existed. The reason for this 1-Frame Delay is that the last input 6 is left behind in the period of Input Buffer.


 Figure 56click here if you want to look at actual command input.


 Diagram 510



 There is a simple solution to this serious problem. The most important message in this chapter is that:

To avoid 1-Frame Delay, you have only to enter Dash Command of the attack before Input Buffer.




 Indeed, you would obtain the best result by using this input method (Figure 57 and Diagram 511). This technique mentioned in this section is called 0-Frame Delay (See also chapter 7).[6]



 Figure 57click here if you want to look at actual command input.


 Diagram 511*
 *Notice that the the first frame of Input Buffer (highlighted yellow) is the special permission for input.



References
[1] VF Moves Project: ttp://vfmoves.blogspot.jp
[2] Top Tips for Command Input 1
[3] General Properties of Attacks
[4] Attack Analysis
[5] Advantage and Disadvantage
[6] Training 1

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